ANNIE BELLE HENRY

Annie HenryRaised by a village, Annie Belle Henry felt compelled to give back and make a difference in the lives of the youth. She felt the best way to do that was to pursue education, so she set out to earn a Bachelor of Science from Edward Waters Collee in 1964 and a Master of Arts from Florida A&M University in 1969. Dr. Henry later furthered her academic standing by obtaining a PhD from Florida State University in 1988. She also became a certified secondary teacher in the state of Florida and a member of the National Education Association.

Dr. Henry’s first job in the field was secondary school teacher in the Bunnell, Florida, Department of Public Education. She quickly realized she had made the right choice; she loved working with children and seeing them grow and thrive. The next stop on Dr. Henry’s journey was the Government of the Virgin Islands in St. Thomas, where she worked as a teacher of secondary social studies and chair of the department. She then decided to expand her reach and advance to the world of higher education. Her position as a secondary school teacher for Bemidji State University in Minnesota allowed her to mentor a great number of people looking to make their way in academia and inspire the next generations. She is thrilled to have sent so many passionate learners and educators out into the workforce.

Now, in Dr. Henry’s free time, she enjoys singing, exercising, and volunteering. She feels fortunate to have avoided the hunger and homelessness so many face, and wants to help in any way she can. Dr. Henry notably served as a representative-recruiter for African-American students and donated money to her alma mater, Edward Walters College. She also likes to write; thus far, she has released two books: “The Girl from Jacksonville Who Dared to Dream, Hope and Believe” and “Feeling Like a Stranger in Your Hometown? Ask the Girl from Jacksonville!”

In recognition of Dr. Henry’s hard work and dedication, an eponymous scholarship was created in her honor at Beridji State University and the locker room at Edward Walters College was named after her. Additionally, she was the recipient of the Skipping Stones Honor Award, as well as awards from the American Red Cross and the Bryn Mawr College for Women in Higher Education Administration. Her achievements have been featured in numerous editions of Who’s Who in American Education and Who’s Who of American Women.

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