Listee Features — Research

LISA M. DUNKLE

Determined to make a positive difference in the world, Lisa Dunkle set her sights on the world of medicine. She particularly wanted to help kids with problems no one knew how to solve. In pursuit of her goals, Dr. Dunkle obtained a Bachelor of Arts from Wellesley College in 1968 and an MD from Johns Hopkins University in 1972. She also earned diplomas from the National Board of Medical Examiners, the American Board of Pediatrics, the American Board of Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, and the Pediatrics Infectious Disease Society. Degrees in hand, Dr. Dunkle set out to make her mark on the field. She started by garnering experience in roles like intern, resident in pediatrics, and fellow of infectious diseases

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JACQUELINE Y. MILLER

Growing up in a farming area in western Pennsylvania, Jacqueline Y. Miller loved wandering outside, collecting butterflies and birds, and going fishing. She decided she wanted to pursue her interests further, so she became a curator of drosophila in the Department of Biology at the University of Pittsburgh. Getting this opportunity was wonderful for her, and only strengthened her passion. Set on her quest for discovery, Dr. Miller advanced through positions like curator of drosophila in the Department of Zoology at the University of Maryland, College Park, instructor in the Department of Biology at Gallaudet College, and assistant curator and entomology associate at the Allyn Museum of Entomology at the Florida Museum of Natural History. She continues to serve as

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CHI YU HU

Three words guided Chi Yu Hu to her profession: interest, duty, and responsibility. She wanted a career that would allow her to both promote progress and help people, and found physics a fascinating way to achieve her goals. She started by earning a Bachelor of Science from National Taiwan University in 1955 and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1962, at which point she joined St. John’s University as a research associate. A year later, Dr. Hu became an assistant professor of physics at California State University. She has been with the school in roles like associate professor, professor, and professor emeritus ever since. Additionally, she served as a National Science Foundation visiting professor at the University

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CATHERINE UYEHARA

Catherine Uyehara has been pursuing science with a passion for as long as she can remember. She was always curious about the world, and found research to be an exciting way to discover new things. She believes in STEM outreach programs because she feels she owes her development as a scientist to inspiring teachers who went out of their way to encourage her curiosity. In middle school, a teacher enabled her to work in a university lab after school to do her first science fair project on using temperature to protect corn plants from fungus. In high school she took part in a National Science Foundation summer science program, which, along with the guidance of an enthusiastic marine biology teacher,

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THELMA DUNNEBACKE DIXON

After decades of experience as a research scientist, Thelma Dunnebacke Dixon considers herself lucky to still be having fun in the role. She loves witnessing change and development, particularly in cells, and has really found her niche at the Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory of the California Department of Health Care Services. She has worked for the institution since 1976, and previously held the title in the Virus Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, between 1954 and 1976. ​ One of the highlights of Dr. Dunnebacke’s journey was having a species of free living amoeba named Naegleria Dunnebackei in her honor. She was also proud to be a grantee of the National Institutes of Health and the National Science

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JEANETTE R. LITTLE

Believing in the importance of being open to new opportunities, Jeanette R. Little has found that research is the perfect field for her. She enjoys looking at where the future is going; medicine and technology are constantly changing, which means there is always something new to discover. It also means she never has to stay in one spot for too long; her role is constantly changing. At the moment, Ms. Little is lending her services to the U.S. Army as a capability area manager in the Virtual Health Research Task Area of the Medical Research and Material Command, the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center as a lab leader of the Mobile Health Innovation Center, and Augusta University as an

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ROSEMARY A. STEVENS

Looking for a path that would allow her to pursue her wide array of interests, Rosemary A. Stevens decided to dedicate herself to academia. That decision paid off, as, more than five decades later, she continues to contribute to the field. Since 2005, Dr. Stevens has served as a DeWitt Wallace Distinguished Scholar of Social Medicine and Public Policy in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, and since 2001, she has served as a professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania. She joined the latter school in 1979 and has held a number of positions over the years, including professor of history and the sociology of science, senior fellow in the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics,

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GRACIELA CHICHILNISKY

Renowned for her work in environmental science, economics, and mathematics, Graciela Chichilnisky is proud of the impact of her contributions to the fields. Some of her most notable achievements include proposing and designing the carbon credit emissions trading market underlying the Kyoto Protocol, and being a lead author on the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that won the 2007 Nobel Prize. She also co-founded Global Thermostat, LLC, in 2010, is the company’s CEO and managing director, and is an active scientist who serves as a special adviser to several U.N. organizations and heads of state. Her pioneering work uses innovative market mechanisms to reduce carbon emissions, conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services. She previously founded and headed two successful technology

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INGE JULIANA SACKMANN CHRISTY

Currently a faculty associate of the California Institute of Technology, Inge Juliana Sackmann Christy loves having the opportunity to advance her field. Her main areas of interest include astrophysics, astronomy, and physics, and she has pursued them at a variety of locations for more than five decades. Dr. Sackmann Christy started out as a postdoctoral fellow at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen and the Max-Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics at Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Germany, and continued on as a research associate for Hamburger Sternwarte in Germany in 1971. She moved to the U.S. that same year, when she joined the California Institute of Technology as a research fellow. She became a research associate at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory between 1974 and 1976,

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L. MIRIAM DICKINSON

Although L. Miriam Dickinson started her professional journey by earning a Bachelor of Arts in music and German with a minor in math at the Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University in 1974, she didn’t have a set goal in mind. She decided to take a position as a research technologist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in 1975, and became very interested in the job. At the time, there weren’t a lot of women in the mathematical sciences, but Dr. Dickinson was determined to succeed. She obtained a Master of Science in biometry from her employer in 1979, and was promoted to research assistant in the division of biometry that same year. She transferred to the Fuqua

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