CORINNE SAMIOS

Growing up with artistic parents, Corinne Samios was almost destined to end up in a creative field. She had always had an eye for color and design, so when her aunt recommended she apply for a job as a colorist with old Deerfield Fabrics, she decided to give it a shot. Ms. Samios didn’t think she would get it since she was still studying interior design and architecture at the Traphagen School of Fashion and the Art Student League at the time, but she persevered. Ms. Samios came out of the interview process on top, and ended up starting her first professional position in 1957 at the young age of 19.

From that point forward, Ms. Samios worked hard to build her name and cement her place in fabric and wallpaper design. She left Deerfield Fabrics in 1963 to take a position with Everfast, where she really made an impression on her peers. This propelled her to jobs at Cohama and Cyrust Clerk, and eventually led her to become the design director and stylist at Brunschqig & Fils in New York City. Ms. Samios served in those capacities for nearly two decades. Notably, she specialized in developing collections based on historical documents.

The highlight of Ms. Samios’s career was going to work in museums in Europe. While she was there, she would make photo journals to bring back to the studio to use as references. This would help her determine her next move. Ms. Samios was also proud of creating musical portraits for the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, France, the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and Old Westbury Gardens, and to have colored one of the designs of renowned designer John Jacoby. She shared her techniques through presentations at the American Association for Textile Colorists & Chemists and the Philadelphia College of Textiles & Science.

Looking to the future, Ms. Samios hopes to be remembered as someone who never lost sight of her integrity and morals. She has always been a spiritual person, and believes that whatever talent she has is a gift to be used with humbleness instead of ego.

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